Deportation Division

In recent years, nearly 130,000 immigrants who joined the military have gained American citizenship. For various reasons, however, many service members fail to complete the naturalization process, resulting in less legal protections. In fact, it is estimated that hundreds of U.S. military veterans have been deported in recent years for minor offenses. 


The CLMP believes that every individual who serves in the U.S. military should have the opportunity to become an American citizen. This means both eliminating barriers and affirmatively facilitating a path to citizenship for service members. 


For those veterans who are at risk of deportation, the CLMP aims to support policies that will allow veterans to lawfully remain in the United States of America. For those veterans who are deported, the CLMP aims to support policy solutions that would make it easier and faster for them to access benefits, be re-patriated, and change his or her status to allow them to lawfully remain in the United States of America.


The CLMP  will strive to raise awareness to this issue until, as a nation, we do not deport veterans.


Relevant articles, legislation, and reports:


· Repatriate Our Patriots Act, February 12, 2019 (https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1078)

· A Deported Veteran Has Been Granted U.S. Citizenship, March 13, 2018 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2018/03/31/a-deported-veteran-has-been-granted-u-s-citizenship-after-14-years-of-living-in-mexico/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.c948f67aae29)

· At the Bunker, March 18, 2016 (https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-18/bunker-veterans-recover-war-and-look-way-back-home)

· “Discharged then Discarded” ACLU, 2016 (https://www.aclusandiego.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/DischargedThenDiscarded-ACLUofCA.pdf




Division Members

Laura Riley, Division Chief

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Renato Izquita

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Scott Cramer

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Hector Barajas

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